LOT & His DAUGHTERS

Lot and his Daughters is one of the most important paintings created by Sir Peter Paul Rubens to have remained in private hands. It was Painted at the height of Sir Peter Paul Rubens’ career, Lot and his Daughters is an outstanding masterpiece of the artist’s early maturity, and one of the most important paintings by the master to have remained in private hands. Unseen for over a hundred years, the work measures over two meters across.

When he painted Lot and Daughters, Sir Peter Paul Rubens had already gained a reputation as one of the most important and fashionable artists in Antwerp, and was at the centre of the European artistic stage. He had worked in Rome, at the court of Vincenzo I Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua, and, in 1609, was appointed court painter to the Archdukes Albert and Isabella of Brussels. During this period Rubens produced some of his most renowned works, including the two monumental altarpieces, The Raising of the Cross, which was commissioned in 1610 for the church of St Walburga, and The Descent from the Cross, painted between 1611-1614 for Antwerp Cathedral. In addition to these public works, Rubens carried out a number of private commissions, instilling traditional religious subjects – including Lot and his Daughters – with an exciting new energy.

The sale of Peter Paul Rubens’ “Lot and His Daughters” which was sold at Christie’s at a remarkable sum of $58 million to become the second most expensive painting sold in 2016, proves that the Old Masters are still valued and the only other Rubens that was sold for more was: “The Master of the Innocents” for $76.5 million in 2002. “Lot and His Daughters” has been in private collections for centuries. It was once owned by the Holy Roman Emperor Joseph I and by the First Duke of Marlborough, John Churchill.

peter_paul_rubens_-_lot_and_his_daughters_in_a_rock_grotto_schwerin

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