Attiéké and Kedjenou

 

Attiéké is a side dish made from cassava that is a part of the cuisine of Côte d’Ivoire in Africa. The dish is prepared from fermented cassava pulp that has been grated or granulated. Dried attiéké is also prepared, which is similar in texture to couscous. It’s a common and traditional dish in Côte d’Ivoire that originated in the southern part of the country, and methods for its production are well known in Côte d’Ivoire and also in Benin. In Côte d’Ivoire, the dish is often served with Kedjenou, a slow-cooked stew. Fresh attiéké can spoil quickly, and is generally be consumed within 24 hours after preparation.

Kedjenou is a spicy stew that is slow-cooked in a sealed canari (terra-cotta pot) over fire or coals and prepared with chicken or guinea hen and vegetables. It is a traditional and popular cuisine of Côte d’Ivoire. Preparation methods for the stew vary. Sometimes little or no added liquid is used in its preparation, allowing the meat to cook in its own juices, which tenderizes the meat and concentrates the flavors of the ingredients.Sometimes the dish is cooked in a wrapped and sealed banana leaf that is placed under hot coals.

 

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